Shopping with tech contact lens – Mojo Vision shows new demo

Shopping with tech contact lens – Mojo Vision shows new demo

AR contact lens manufacturer Mojo Vision is back with a new use case: an Alexa shopping list for the supermarket.

Mojo Vision has been working on its Mojo Lens tech contact lens for about five years. In April, the company unveiled its latest “feature complete” prototype, a hard contact lens with a mini-display that can already be worn in the eye.

The display projects digital information into the field of view at a viewing angle of 15 degrees. The lens tracks eye movements thanks to integrated motion sensors and can thus display different image sections depending on the viewing angle. The display can currently only show monochrome green.

Contact lens shopping with Alexa

Mojo Vision now shows a new demo for a possible application scenario: an Alexa shopping list that can be kept in view while shopping at the supermarket. The list is operated by eye movements and updated in real time via the Internet, for example when family members add more items.

The video below shows a concept visualization, but according to Mojo Vision, the app exists and works. Amazon has supported the development.

Video: Mojo Vision

“Alexa Shopping List is a powerful example of how Mojo Lens can be a platform for a range of useful eyes-up, hands-free consumer applications and experiences,” said Mike Wiemer, VP of Engineering, CTO and co-founder of Mojo Vision.

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Mojo Vision otherwise says it is “making significant progress in developing its smart contact lens technology”. The company, which has about 100 employees, hopes to first get clearance for medical use scenarios in the upcoming years and then aim for a launch in the consumer market.

Price-wise, the device is expected to land in the smartphone range. However, the lenses have to be produced individually for wearers, as is common with hard contact lenses, which makes sales more difficult.